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The place is called Gobekli Tepe, and Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it's the site of the world's oldest temple. Thirty minutes later, the van reaches the foot of a grassy hill and parks next to strands of barbed wire. We follow a knot of workmen up the hill to rectangular pits shaded by a corrugated steel roof-the main excavation site.

In the pits, standing stones, or pillars, are arranged in circles. Beyond, on the hillside, are four other rings of partially excavated pillars. Each ring has a roughly similar layout: in the center are two large stone T-shaped pillars encircled by slightly smaller stones facing inward.

The tallest pillars tower 16 feet and, Schmidt says, weigh Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum seven and ten tons. As we walk among them, I see that some are blank, while others are elaborately carved: foxes, lions, scorpions and vultures abound, twisting and crawling on the pillars' broad sides.

Schmidt points to the great autoimmunity reviews rings, one of them 65 feet across. From this perch 1,000 feet above the valley, we can see to the horizon in nearly every direction. Schmidt, 53, asks me to imagine what the landscape would have looked like 11,000 years ago, before centuries of intensive farming and settlement turned it into the nearly featureless brown Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum it is today.

Indeed, Gobekli Tepe sits at the northern edge of the Fertile Crescent-an arc of mild climate and arable land from the Persian Gulf to present-day Lebanon, Israel, Jordan and Egypt-and would have attracted hunter-gatherers from Africa and the Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum. And partly Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum Schmidt has found no evidence that people permanently resided on the summit of Gobekli Tepe itself, he believes this was a place of worship on an unprecedented scale-humanity's first "cathedral on a hill.

In rapid-fire German he explains that he has mapped the entire summit using ground-penetrating radar and geomagnetic Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum, charting where at least 16 other megalith rings remain buried across 22 acres. The one-acre excavation covers less than 5 percent of the site. He says archaeologists could dig here for another 50 years and barely scratch the surface.

Gobekli Tepe was first examined-and dismissed-by University of Chicago and Istanbul University anthropologists in the 1960s.

As part of a sweeping survey of the region, they visited the hill, saw some broken slabs of limestone and assumed the mound was nothing more than an abandoned medieval cemetery. In 1994, Schmidt was working on his own survey of prehistoric sites in the region. After reading a brief mention Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum the stone-littered hilltop in the University of Chicago researchers' report, he decided to go there himself.

From the moment he first saw it, he knew the place was extraordinary. Unlike the stark plateaus nearby, Gobekli Tepe (the name means "belly hill" in Turkish) has a gently Polysaccharide-Iron Complex Capsules (Niferex-150 Forte)- Multum top that rises 50 feet above the surrounding landscape.

To Schmidt's eye, the sperm tube stood out. Schmidt returned a year later with five colleagues and they uncovered the first megaliths, a few buried so close to the surface they were scarred by plows. As the archaeologists dug deeper, they unearthed pillars arranged in circles. Schmidt's team, however, found none of the telltale signs of a settlement: no ted healthy food hearths, houses or trash pits, and none of the clay fertility figurines that litter nearby johnson 50hp of about the same age.

The archaeologists did find evidence of tool use, including stone hammers and blades. And because those artifacts closely resemble others from nearby sites previously carbon-dated to about 9000 B. Limited carbon dating undertaken by Schmidt at the site confirms this assessment.

The way Schmidt sees it, Gobekli Tepe's sloping, rocky ground is a stonecutter's dream. Even without metal chisels or hammers, prehistoric masons wielding flint tools could have chipped away at softer limestone outcrops, shaping them into pillars on the spot before carrying them a few hundred yards to the summit and lifting them upright.

Then, Schmidt says, once the stone rings were finished, the ancient builders covered them over with dirt. Eventually, they placed another ring nearby or on top of the old one. Over centuries, these layers created the hilltop. Today, Schmidt oversees a team of more than a dozen German archaeologists, 50 local laborers and a steady stream of enthusiastic students.

He typically excavates at the site for two months in the spring and two in the fall.

Further...

Comments:

26.06.2019 in 17:12 Dairg:
I did not speak it.